Budka Julia

Budka Julia

Professor of Egyptian Archaeology and Art History; PI of ERC Project DiverseNile

MAIN AREAS OF RESEARCH
Late Bronze Age and Iron Age, Egypt and Nubia, Material culture, Settlement archaeology and social relationships, Cultural identities, Funerary culture and mortuary architecture

EDUCATION

2007    Dr phil awarded in Egyptology, University of Vienna, Austria

2000    Mphil in Egyptology, University of Vienna, Austria

1995-2000     Study of Egyptology (Major) and Classical Archaeology (Minor), University of Vienna

CAREER HISTORY

Since 2020 Principal Investigator of the ERC Consolidator Grant project DiverseNile, LMU Munich

Since 2015   Professor of Egyptian Archaeology and Art History, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (since 2020 tenured)

2012-2018    Principal Investigator of the ERC Starting Grant project AcrossBorders, hosted by the Austrian Academy of Sciences from 12/2012 to 03/2015; transfered to Munich in 04/2015

2012-2017    Principal Investigator of FWF START project “Across ancient borders and cultures”, hosted by the Austrian Academy of Sciences (OREA, Egypt & Levant)

2011-2012    Assistant Professor (Universitätsassistentin PostDOC) at the University of Vienna, Institute of Egyptology (granted leave from Humboldt University)

2010            Lecturer at the University of Leipzig, Institute of Egyptology

2004-2012    Scientific Researcher and Lecturer at the Institute of Archaeology, Humboldt University Berlin, Department of Egyptology and Northeast African Archaeology

HONORARY POSTS & ELECTED MEMBERSHIP 

since 2019 Corresponding Member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences

2015-2018 Member of the board of directors of the Young Academy

2014-2016            Member of the Akademierat, Austrian Academy of Sciences

2014-2019 Member of the “Young Academy”, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Vienna)

since 2014            Member of the managing board of the “Freunde des Naturhistorischen Museums” (http://freunde.nhm-wien.ac.at/)

CV Budka

Publication list Budka

Neueste Beiträge

Pastoralism in the Kingdom of Kerma: upcoming lecture

I am delighted to announce that the DiverseNile Seminar Series 2022 continues after our short summer break. Next Tuesday, Sept 27, Jérôme Dubosson, Université de Neuchâtel, will talk about “Living and dying with livestock: Some thoughts on pastoralism in the Kingdom of Kerma during the 3rd and 2nd millennia BCE.”

Trained in archaeology and anthropology, Jérôme wrote his doctoral thesis on the cultural and social role of cattle among pastoralists in North East Africa. His interdisciplinary research aims to better understand the development of African pastoralism in time and space. Since 2007, Jérôme has been working with the Swiss Archaeological Mission in Kerma. He recently wrote the article “Cattle Cultures in Ancient Nubia” for the Oxford Handbook of Ancient Nubia (2021).

In this article, he gives a very useful overview of the ritual and cultural role of cattle in Nubian pre- and protohistoric societies according to archaeological findings like bucrania and engraved figures of cattle in rock art.

The question of the use of bucrania is also a very interesting one for our DiverseNile project. As Jérôme remarks, such deposits are mostly attested in the rich tombs in the main centres of the Kerma empire, at Kerma and Sai Island (Dubosson 2021). In marginal cemeteries of the Kerma kingdom, bucrania are rare and animal deposits are mainly found as meat offerings inside the grave. This also holds true for two of the Kerma cemeteries in our MUAFS concession, at Ferka (3-G-19) and Ginis (GiE 003) as well as for their closest parallels, the cemeteries of Ukma and Akasha in the Batn el-Haggar. Since all these marginal sites, especially GiE 003, find otherwise close parallels in the cemeteries at Sai, this really seems to relate to varying funerary customs in the hinterland of the northern Kerma stronghold.

There is much potential in further research on provincial Kerma cemeteries – as Carl Walsh recently pointed out in an inspiring article with an exciting fresh approach, social and funerary practices in the Kerma kingdom seem to reflect complex interactions between regions and communities in what can be called a “pastoral state” (Walsh 2022). We still know little about the internal structure of this state, but we should probably consider various hierarchical local responses determined by different communities’ ability to consume (cf. Lemos and Budka 2021). In this respect, the different roles of livestock within such marginal communities and regions – despite of a central value given to cattle – are of key interest.

For now, I am very much looking forwards to Jérôme’s upcoming lecture!

References

Dubosson 2021 = Dubosson, J., Cattle cultures in Nubia, in: Emberling, G. & Williams, B. (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Nubia, Oxford 2021, 908-926, https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190496272.013.48

Lemos and Budka 2021 = Lemos, R. and Budka, J., Alternatives to colonization and marginal identities in New Kingdom colonial Nubia (1550-1070 BCE), World Archaeology 53/3 (2021), 401-418, https://doi.org/10.1080/00438243.2021.1999853

Walsh 2022 = Walsh, C., Marginal communities and cooperative strategies in the Kerma pastoral state, JNEH 10 (2022), https://doi.org./10.1515/janeh-2021-0014

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